Beyoncé Online

beyonceonline.org

Welcome

Welcome to Beyoncé Online - your #1 source for everything Beyoncé Knowles. You'll find here a lot of interesting information, one of the biggest photo galleries with over 100.000 pictures, downloads and more! Be sure to check out the latest news about Mrs. Carter and leave your comments. We hope you'll enjoy your stay and come back soon! Have fun!

Latest news

The Lion King Soundtrack to Release on July 11th

June 24, 2019

Disney’s The Lion King—starring Beyoncé as Nala and Donald Glover as Simba—is in theaters on July 19. Today, the film’s soundtrack was announced. It’s out digitally on July 11 and physically July 19 (via Walt Disney Records). Pre-order now!

The soundtrack features Beyoncé and Childish Gambino’s rendition of “Can You Feel the Love Tonight,” which was previewed in a recent teaser.

The soundtrack also includes selections from Hans Zimmer’s score, production from Pharrell (on Tracks 4, 9, 12, and 19), and appearances from Seth Rogen (who voices Pumbaa), Chiwetel Ejiofor (Scar), John Oliver (Zazu), Billy Eichner (Timon), and others.

In addition, there is a brand new Elton John track called “Never Too Late.” John co-wrote the track with Tim Rice; it’s produced by Greg Kurstin. Check out the tracklist, which includes a conspicuous TBA for Track 14, below.

Jon Favreau Reveals Beyoncé Wrote New Song for The Lion King

June 24, 2019

With tickets now officially on sale for The Lion King here at Fandango, we spoke exclusively with director Jon Favreau, who has followed up his work helming the 2016 live-action redo of The Jungle Book with another groundbreaking effort here. He tells us how the highly anticipated new version is different while still honoring both the original movie and the iconic stage adaptation, the challenges of accomplishing such changes, and how the casting bridges the various versions and generations. And yes, he lost his mind over learning Beyoncé would be involved.

Fandango: Beyoncé is obviously a big deal for this movie.

Jon Favreau: Yes.

Fandango: I read that you wanted her involved so bad you were willing to work around her schedule. Did you have to coordinate much in that regard?

Jon Favreau: Sure, she's very busy. She's doing a lot. She was directing Homecoming, making Lemonade, her family got larger while we were working together. And between touring and albums, she really has a prolific career in many areas. She's an artist and a singer and a performer and very involved. She has a lot of things going on. But she's incredibly engaged and committed, and so what was wonderful was that when we did get together to work, she was exceptional, as you can imagine in her performance, but also really gives everything a lot of thought. She's very hard-working and puts a lot of thought into things, and would often be so extremely well-prepared that she was clearly working on a lot on this even when we weren't together.

Beyoncé Wins at the 2019 BET Awards

June 24, 2019

The 2019 BET Awards were handed out Sunday night at the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles. Beyoncé was nominated in four categories and won in one:

Best Female R&B/Pop Artist
Beyoncé (WINNER)
Ella Mai
H.E.R.
Solange
SZA
Teyana Taylor

Congrats!

"Apeshit" Wins at ASCAP Rhythm & Soul Music Awards

June 22, 2019

The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) celebrated its unparalleled roster of music legends, past and present, at the 34th annual ASCAP Rhythm & Soul Music Awards on Thursday. The event recognized special honorees and the songwriters and publishers of the most-performed ASCAP songs of the past year on the R&B/hip-hop, rap and gospel charts.

Winning Top R&B/Hip-Hop Songs included The Carters' "Apeshit" written by Beyoncé, Kiari “Offset” Cephus, Quavious "Quavo" Marshall and Shawn “JAY-Z” Carter. Congrats!

The Lion King "Can You Feel the Love Tonight" Trailer

June 20, 2019

A new trailer for "The Lion King" featuring Beyonce singing "Can You Feel the Love Tonight" has been released!

Inside WACO's Wearable Art Gala - Beyoncé Interview

June 13, 2019

Watch Beyoncé's interview from the Inside WACO's Wearable Art Gala special on OWN TV below.

Inside WACO's Wearable Art Gala on OWN TV

June 10, 2019

Get an inside look at WACO's star-studded Wearable Art Gala. The night of stars features appearances from Beyoncé, Tina Lawson, Kelly Rowland, Viola Davis and many more. Tune in on Tuesday, June 11, at 10/9c.

Beyonce.com: Happy Pride!

June 8, 2019

Beyonce took to her website to celebrate Pride Month.

Beyoncé makes surprise appearance at AFI Life Achievement Awards

June 8, 2019

Beyoncé appeared on stage at the American Film Institute’s Life Achievement Awards to present AFI’s Franklin J. Schaffner Alumni Medal to Melina Matsoukas on Thursday. The singer wrote on Instagram: "Melina, I’m so proud of you my sister. Love you deep."



Latest photos

hq01.jpg
42.jpg
10.jpg
11.jpg
12.jpg
hq02.jpg
hq01.jpg
07.jpg
05.jpg
08.jpg
06.jpg
09.jpg
03.jpg
04.jpg
02.jpg
01.jpg
4000.jpg
4001.jpg
3997.jpg
3999.jpg
3996.jpg
3998.jpg
August 15, 2018

Beyoncé's September Vogue Issue in Her Own Words: Her Life, Her Body, Her Heritage

Do you remember a world before Beyoncé? The singer has been in our hearts and headphones for more than 20 years, from teenager to mother of three. The Queen graces Vogue’s September issue this year, sharing the story of her latest pregnancy and delivery, her thoughts on body acceptance and the influence of her ancestry, and the legacy she hopes to leave her children. Beyoncé’s fourth Vogue cover is also historic: It was shot by 23-year-old Tyler Mitchell, a rising young black photographer from Atlanta, hand-selected by the star. In this month’s cover slideshow, the Houston native stuns in Louis Vuitton, Valentino, and Gucci.




Pregnancy & Body Acceptance
After the birth of my first child, I believed in the things society said about how my body should look. I put pressure on myself to lose all the baby weight in three months, and scheduled a small tour to assure I would do it. Looking back, that was crazy. I was still breastfeeding when I performed the Revel shows in Atlantic City in 2012. After the twins, I approached things very differently.

I was 218 pounds the day I gave birth to Rumi and Sir. I was swollen from toxemia and had been on bed rest for over a month. My health and my babies’ health were in danger, so I had an emergency C-section. We spent many weeks in the NICU. My husband was a soldier and such a strong support system for me. I am proud to have been a witness to his strength and evolution as a man, a best friend, and a father. I was in survival mode and did not grasp it all until months later. Today I have a connection to any parent who has been through such an experience. After the C-section, my core felt different. It had been major surgery. Some of your organs are shifted temporarily, and in rare cases, removed temporarily during delivery. I am not sure everyone understands that. I needed time to heal, to recover. During my recovery, I gave myself self-love and self-care, and I embraced being curvier. I accepted what my body wanted to be. After six months, I started preparing for Coachella. I became vegan temporarily, gave up coffee, alcohol, and all fruit drinks. But I was patient with myself and enjoyed my fuller curves. My kids and husband did, too.

I think it’s important for women and men to see and appreciate the beauty in their natural bodies. That’s why I stripped away the wigs and hair extensions and used little makeup for this shoot.

To this day my arms, shoulders, breasts, and thighs are fuller. I have a little mommy pouch, and I’m in no rush to get rid of it. I think it’s real. Whenever I’m ready to get a six-pack, I will go into beast zone and work my ass off until I have it. But right now, my little FUPA and I feel like we are meant to be.

Opening Doors
Until there is a mosaic of perspectives coming from different ethnicities behind the lens, we will continue to have a narrow approach and view of what the world actually looks like. That is why I wanted to work with this brilliant 23-year-old photographer Tyler Mitchell.

When I first started, 21 years ago, I was told that it was hard for me to get onto covers of magazines because black people did not sell. Clearly that has been proven a myth. Not only is an African American on the cover of the most important month for Vogue, this is the first ever Vogue cover shot by an African American photographer.

It’s important to me that I help open doors for younger artists. There are so many cultural and societal barriers to entry that I like to do what I can to level the playing field, to present a different point of view for people who may feel like their voices don’t matter.

Imagine if someone hadn’t given a chance to the brilliant women who came before me: Josephine Baker, Nina Simone, Eartha Kitt, Aretha Franklin, Tina Turner, Diana Ross, Whitney Houston, and the list goes on. They opened the doors for me, and I pray that I’m doing all I can to open doors for the next generation of talents.

If people in powerful positions continue to hire and cast only people who look like them, sound like them, come from the same neighborhoods they grew up in, they will never have a greater understanding of experiences different from their own. They will hire the same models, curate the same art, cast the same actors over and over again, and we will all lose. The beauty of social media is it’s completely democratic. Everyone has a say. Everyone’s voice counts, and everyone has a chance to paint the world from their own perspective.

Ancestry
I come from a lineage of broken male-female relationships, abuse of power, and mistrust. Only when I saw that clearly was I able to resolve those conflicts in my own relationship. Connecting to the past and knowing our history makes us both bruised and beautiful.

I researched my ancestry recently and learned that I come from a slave owner who fell in love with and married a slave. I had to process that revelation over time. I questioned what it meant and tried to put it into perspective. I now believe it’s why God blessed me with my twins. Male and female energy was able to coexist and grow in my blood for the first time. I pray that I am able to break the generational curses in my family and that my children will have less complicated lives.

My Journey
There are many shades on every journey. Nothing is black or white. I’ve been through hell and back, and I’m grateful for every scar. I have experienced betrayals and heartbreaks in many forms. I have had disappointments in business partnerships as well as personal ones, and they all left me feeling neglected, lost, and vulnerable. Through it all I have learned to laugh and cry and grow. I look at the woman I was in my 20s and I see a young lady growing into confidence but intent on pleasing everyone around her. I now feel so much more beautiful, so much sexier, so much more interesting. And so much more powerful.

Freedom
I don’t like too much structure. I like to be free. I’m not alive unless I am creating something. I’m not happy if I’m not creating, if I’m not dreaming, if I’m not creating a dream and making it into something real. I’m not happy if I’m not improving, evolving, moving forward, inspiring, teaching, and learning.

Coachella
I had a clear vision for Coachella. I was so specific because I’d seen it, I’d heard it, and it was already written inside of me. One day I was randomly singing the black national anthem to Rumi while putting her to sleep. I started humming it to her every day. In the show at the time I was working on a version of the anthem with these dark minor chords and stomps and belts and screams. After a few days of humming the anthem, I realized I had the melody wrong. I was singing the wrong anthem. One of the most rewarding parts of the show was making that change. I swear I felt pure joy shining down on us. I know that most of the young people on the stage and in the audience did not know the history of the black national anthem before Coachella. But they understood the feeling it gave them.

It was a celebration of all the people who sacrificed more than we could ever imagine, who moved the world forward so that it could welcome a woman of color to headline such a festival.

OTR II
One of the most memorable moments for me on the On the Run II tour was the Berlin show at Olympiastadion, the site of the 1936 Olympics. This is a site that was used to promote the rhetoric of hate, racism, and divisiveness, and it is the place where Jesse Owens won four gold medals, destroying the myth of white supremacy. Less than 90 years later, two black people performed there to a packed, sold-out stadium. When Jay and I sang our final song, we saw everyone smiling, holding hands, kissing, and full of love. To see such human growth and connection—I live for those moments.

Legacy
My mother taught me the importance not just of being seen but of seeing myself. As the mother of two girls, it’s important to me that they see themselves too—in books, films, and on runways. It’s important to me that they see themselves as CEOs, as bosses, and that they know they can write the script for their own lives—that they can speak their minds and they have no ceiling. They don’t have to be a certain type or fit into a specific category. They don’t have to be politically correct, as long as they’re authentic, respectful, compassionate, and empathetic. They can explore any religion, fall in love with any race, and love who they want to love.

I want the same things for my son. I want him to know that he can be strong and brave but that he can also be sensitive and kind. I want my son to have a high emotional IQ where he is free to be caring, truthful, and honest. It’s everything a woman wants in a man, and yet we don’t teach it to our boys.

I hope to teach my son not to fall victim to what the internet says he should be or how he should love. I want to create better representations for him so he is allowed to reach his full potential as a man, and to teach him that the real magic he possesses in the world is the power to affirm his own existence.

I’m in a place of gratitude right now.

I am accepting of who I am. I will continue to explore every inch of my soul and every part of my artistry.

I want to learn more, teach more, and live in full.

I’ve worked long and hard to be able to get to a place where I can choose to surround myself with what fulfills and inspires me.

Get the September issue now.
0